Top 5 Black Fountain Pen Inks

There are many aspects that make fountain pens enjoyable, but perhaps none are as fun as experimenting with different ink colors. From blue to red and chartreuse, there’s something out there for everybody.

 

However, most of us can’t help but go back to the basics of fountain pen ink the deeper we go into the hobby. Everyday writing often calls for standard black fountain pen ink, a staple for any enthusiast’s collection. But that doesn’t mean there is no variety or fun to be had in this color.

 

Here are five of the top black fountain pen inks you can choose from:

 

J. Herbin Perle Noire

Made by the oldest ink manufacturer in the world, this water-based ink is a great all-around choice. J. Herbin Perle Noir flows smoothly and works well for most pens. It also writes nicely on a wide range of papers since it doesn’t bleed or feather.

 

In terms of color, this J. Herbin ink is an opaque, saturated black. Wider nibs will allow some shading to come through in writing. Another great thing about this ink is that it has decent water and highlighter resistance, though it is not waterproof. Its dependability and versatility make it a top black fountain pen ink.

 

Kaweco Pearl Black

A Kaweco fountain pen ink that is worth looking at is Pearl Black. In comparison to J. Herbin Perle Noire, it is slightly blacker and faster drying. It is also water-based, well-behaved, and easy to use. 

 

Apart from writing, this ink is also excellent for artists. It creates clean, controlled lines and shading and can be used with water brushes, which might cause other inks to feather or separate. You can count on Kaweco Pearl Black to remain dark and maintain original sketch lines even after adding some shading. 

 

Pilot Iroshizuku Take-Sumi

Sometimes a more muted black ink is preferable, especially for daily use. If you’re not a fan of extremely dark black ink, then Pilot Iroshizuku Take-Sumi might be a better option for you. Its color makes it well-suited for professional and office use.

 

Pilot fountain pen inks flow smoothly in many pens and are very easy to clean. While it doesn’t have as much shading compared to the rest of the Iroshizuku inks, Take-Sumi is a fairly straightforward muted black color. Relative to others, this Pilot ink is quick to dry but not the fastest-drying ink.

 

Platinum Carbon Black

Some fountain pen users may require more heavy-duty inks that will last a lifetime. For this, a waterproof black ink like Platinum Carbon Black is perfect. This ink uses carbon pigments instead of dyes to give it an archival quality, meaning it is smear-proof, highlighter-proof, and fade-proof. 

 

While Platinum Carbon Black takes a while to dry, it is well worth it for its longevity. Anybody looking for a pitch black saturated ink that will not budge will be pleased with this fountain pen ink.

 

Aurora Black

Wrapping up this list is a water-based ink that is a great go-to black for many writers. Aurora Black Ink is excellent at producing rich, dark, black lines. It is generally well-behaved, meaning it does not feather, flow too wet or dry, and cleans up well. 

 

This Italian-made ink is darkest on smoother papers like Rhodia and Clairefontaine but still appears quite dark on more absorbent types. A good quality black ink such as this can make the act of writing much more enjoyable, which is something that the brand highly encourages.

 

The Bottom Line

High-quality black ink can make any fountain pen enthusiast’s daily writing all the more enjoyable. Not only that but having a good pen and ink can also fuel self-empowerment through mindfulness and expression through writing. And perhaps a dependable and beautiful black ink can make those meaningful words come to life on a page.

 

 

Written by EndlessPens Blogger Ramona Kabigting

Author: Ramona

1 comment

Stephanie Hyatt

Perle Noir is my #2, while the most overlooked, magnificent, highly saturated black is Lamy Crystal Obsidian. Because it has a dark teal base – which is usually not noticeable – on coated paper with wet/bold nibs, it can appear to have a subtle sheen. Even on standard papers, it rarely feathers, and the saturation commands attention.

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