Always Inked: TWSBI GO

I must say that I’m not an expert or connoisseur when it comes to fountain pens. My choices are usually driven primarily by affordability and usability, followed by aesthetics, then branding. Having seriously used fountain pens for only about two years, I still consider myself more of an explorer. So when the TWSBI GO was introduced into the market, I knew I just had to try it.

The TWSBI GO falls within the under-$20 range, making it an affordable pen. Made of plastic that is lightweight and durable enough, with a cap that seals when snapped closed, it can be one of your knock-around pens. The cap posts securely (though I choose not to), with a small lanyard loop that can double as a roll-stop. The body has some girth to it as well. Some say it’s a clunky-looking pen, but for me, it’s quirky enough to be visually appealing. I’ll just have to wait and see if the material can stand the rigours of daily use.

For me, the nib writes immediately out of the box. It is a smooth and wet writer with the extra-fine nib laying down more of a fine line. Reverse writing also works well. I have also used the 1.1 mm stub both for writing and sketching; and found that it can handle ink with shimmer. So far, I haven’t experienced any hard starts or skips with both nibs.

Let me just say, demonstrator pens always catch my eye. Seeing the inner workings of the pen, as well as how the ink swirls and flows within the body truly sparks my interest. With the TWSBI GO, the mechanism is so enjoyably visible. In addition, that huge and solid spring is quite cool to see in action. The ink is simply loaded into the pen by unscrewing the barrel to access the plunger, dipping the nib into the ink bottle, then pressing down on the plunger and releasing. Holding up to 1.6 ml of ink, this pen is an attractive option for ink-driven pen people out there (like me). Its user-friendliness is an added advantage, especially for those just getting to know fountain pens.

The TWSBI GO’s grip is made of a different, translucent kind of plastic. It is tapering and smooth until it comes near the base of the nib, where it is molded into a triangular shape. I like the feel of it in my hands; and that faceted grip serves as a tactile reminder for repositioning my fingers.

Overall, I like the TWSBI GO. It is a good pen to begin your journey with, and one I would recommend to a friend. It is affordable enough, with less expensive materials balanced by a great filling mechanism. The nib works well for me, but some have reported issues that may be attributed to quality control.

I encourage you to try it out first if you can. It’s an interesting pen and fun to use, but it may not be for everyone. If its features appeal to you, why not make it part of your everyday-carry?

 

 

Written by Lekz Umali
Check out her art on Instagram!

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